The Global Basecamps Blog

Top 5 Things To Do in Phuket

7.2.2014

by sean

Traditional Wooden BoatFamed for its beautiful coastline and infamous nightlife, Phuket has long been a popular destination for shoestring backpackers and jet setters alike. Such popularity has created the opportunity for a daunting amount of activities both in Phuket and the surrounding area, so we've sorted through the clutter and come up with a list of our travel expert's Top 5 Things to do in Phuket so you can get the most out of your adventure in paradise. 

Read More

Pursuing Pleasure in Thailand

10.7.2011

by danielle

Thailand

Danielle is an international peace advocate and Co-founder of the nonprofit Kids for Peace who recently graduated from Harvard with degrees in Religion and Sociology. From summer 2011-2012, Danielle will spend nearly a year traveling in Asia and Africa. Her blog documents her experiences as she seeks out new adventures, learns about other ways of life, and studies issues related to vulnerable children and conflict resolution. Read her last guest blog here.

On one of the last days of my Southeast Asia tour, I picked up a copy of Eat, Pray, Love from a used bookstore and realized that Elizabeth and I were on the same trip. Sure there are some notable differences: the autobiography’s author had suffered a horrible divorce prompting her to visit three I’s—Italy, India, and Indonesia—with the goals of pursuing pleasure, devotion and balance. I had no such explicit goal at the outset of my trip, but here I was, lying on a sun-kissed beach in Koh Samui, Thailand, reading my book, sipping a Mai Tai, and…pursuing pleasure.

Read More

A Buddhist Tour of Southeast Asia

10.4.2011

by danielle

Danielle is an international peace advocate and Co-founder of the nonprofit Kids for Peace who recently graduated from Harvard with degrees in Religion and Sociology. From summer 2011-2012, Danielle will spend nearly a year traveling in Asia and Africa. Her blog documents her experiences as she seeks out new adventures, learns about other ways of life, and studies issues related to vulnerable children and conflict resolution.

Rice Paddies

After four years of hard work completing my undergraduate degrees, I decided to treat myself to a trip I had dreamed about since my youth. Southeast Asia beckoned me with images of orange clad monks, golden Buddha statues, and seemingly endless rice paddies. With the highest proportion of practicing Buddhists on the planet, I went to experience peace: to meditate in temples, contemplate beauty from the peaks of Laotian mountains, learn and connect.

One month of travel took me to the magnificent temples of Siem Reap, Cambodia, rural villages of Northern Laos, and tranquil beaches of Koh Samui, Thailand. As part of my personal mandate to experience the fullness of life, I sought not only experiences that foster peace and joy, but those that could teach me about human suffering—the key component of the Four Nobel Truths that form the basis of religious practice and culture for much of the region. I designed a trip that would go beyond touring the temples and art I admired and delve into the depths of the human experience, embracing too the suffering true of our existence.

Read More

Off the Beaten Path in Southern Thailand

6.6.2011

by michelle

Our new Travel Specialist, Michelle Barth, spent 2 months traveling throughout Southeast Asia. She took a biking tour in Chiang Rai and discovered delicious food in Ubud, Bali. Here she shares with us one of her favorite locations in Thailand, Koh Lanta.Koh Lanta Eco Resort

With Thailand still attracting approximately 15 million tourists a year, most travelers head down south to soak up the sun on some of the world’s most famous beaches. Tourists have been flocking to destinations like Phuket, Koh Samui, Krabi, and Koh Pha Ngan for years. Yes, these popular spots have some of the best beaches, but an overdeveloped beach flooded with tourists isn’t my ideal vacation experience. If you are wondering what Phuket may have been like 10+ years ago, get off the main tourist track, and head to the beaches of Koh Lanta.

Read More

Exploring Singapore

1.13.2011

by ali

Though many of the laws and regulations in Singapore can be shocking to tourists, as a result the country is very clean, safe, and beautiful.  It has breathtaking beaches, delicious food, and a vast array of culture to experience.  Despite the fact that English is commonly spoken there, Singapore’s culture is a melting pot of Chinese, Malaysian, and Indonesian.  There is other heavy foreign influence making is one of the most diverse centers in Asia.  If you have the opportunity to visit this unique country here are a few of our recommendations on how to experience the best it has to offer!

Pulau Ubin: A Naturalist’s Paradise

Pulau Ubin

If your looking for a unique day trip in Singapore Pulau Ubin, an island just off the northeastern tip of Singapore, offers a look into a small town left untouched by the development of bustling Singapore.  Pulau Ubin is a 15-minute boat ride from Changi Point Jetty. It offers an escape from the metropolitan city and is like taking a stroll through Singapore in the 1960’s.  With less than 100 inhabitants, it is just 5 miles across and 1 mile wide. As one of Singapore’s few remaining great nature areas, the island has vast areas of jungle and swamp that sustain a wide variety of animals. Renting mountain bikes is a great way to explore the jungle and scenery of the island.  There are also 2 beaches on the island, Noordin and Mamam, where visitors can camp.

Read More

Ask An Expert

Categories

see all

Subscribe to Email Updates